Dutch National Costumes

traditional Dutch Costumes

Dutch Costumes

Not long ago clothing was based on local traditions and customs. There were no national brands or fashions. The clothing that one wore reflected the culture of the place: their village, their region.

Traditional Dutch Dress

While there may have been less individuality within any given group, there was more diversity between nations and regions; each area had its own costume.

The following is a collection of traditional Dutch costumes, showing the regional differences between different parts of this small country. The photos were taken in 1916 and the photographer pointed out that

The individuals pictured are not dressed extras, but the actual and usual wearers of their costumes, so these images, therefore offer an authentic  impression of the national dress.

The first set of pictures document the national dress worn by the inhabitants of North Holland. There were three main areas of cultural dress. There were:  Marken and Volendam, West Friesland, and the Gooi.

A woman from Marken Island, North Holland, wearing traditional costume. The elaborate breast plate is called "construction".

A woman from Marken Island, North Holland, wearing traditional costume. The elaborate breast plate is called “construction”.

Woman in Full Costume

Woman in Full Costume

Wedding Dress

Wedding Dress

The picture above is of a wedding procession on Marken Island. Everyone is wearing traditional dress. This in itself is a sharp contrast to the modern Western practice of the bride wearing a white wedding dress and the groom wearing a tuxedo.  It is hard to imagine but just over a hundred years ago,  what we consider tradition was anything but.

Child's Costume from Marken

Child’s Costume from Marken

Girl's Costume

Girl’s Costume

Sunday Best Clothes: A Man and Woman from Voldam in their Sunday Clothes

Sunday Best Clothes: A Man and Woman from Voldam in their Sunday Clothes

Boy and girl of Volendam.

Boy and girl of Volendam.

Young Ducth Woman

Young Dutch Woman

The picture above is of a young Duct woman from the Voldam area.  She is wearing her Sunday best.

West Friesian Costume: Young Woman Wearing aLace Cap

West Friesian Costume: Young Woman Wearing aLace Cap

Older woman from West-Friesland in Holland Hull and boat hat.

Older woman from West-Friesland in Holland Hull and boat hat.

The so called “boat hat” was named after its hull-like shape.  Made from very fine straw, this hat was typically worn by peasants. On Sundays the peasants would wear a hat with a white side edge, and if they were in mourning, they would put on a black border.

Two women from the island of Terschelling.

Two women from the island of Terschelling.

A young man and woman wearing traditional Dutch costume.

A young man and woman wearing traditional Dutch costume.

Around the House

Around the House

Man and woman in Laren, (in the Gooi).

Man and woman in Laren, (in the Gooi).

Dutch Woman With Square Cap

Dutch Woman With Square Cap

Two Children in Traditional Dress

Two Children in Traditional Dress

Ducth Bride and Groom in Traditional Dress. The top hat seems to be a foreign influence.

Ducth Bride and Groom in Traditional Dress. The top hat seems to be a foreign influence.

Ducth Fisherman and His Wife

Ducth Fisherman and His Wife

Young Ducth girl waring a hat.

Young Ducth girl waring a hat.

Man and Woman

Man and Woman

Two young women from Soest wearing square hats.

Two young women from Soest wearing square hats.

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I hope that these pictures have provided you with a vivid look into the past and a way of life that has been lost to modern consumerism and the global economy: a culture were clothes were unique, prized objects, that confirmed the wearer’s identity and pride in their culture and roots. Think about that the next time you buy a mass produced t-shirt sewn in a sweat shop in some third world country.

For more images like these visit http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20665/20665-h/20665-h.htm

Movies

The invention of the motion picture camera and projector soon led to the growth of a new industry: the movie industry. Early films were entirely silent and relied on visual depictions and sometimes printed text to tell the story; dialogue could not be reproduced because the first movie cameras and projectors were not capable of synchronizing sound recordings with the moving images.  Movie theater owners often hired pianists and other musicians to play the screen’s music score live so as to add dramatic effect to key scenes. Many silent movies were published with music scores which would then be played the by the house musicians of the local movie theater.

Despite the primitive quality of the early films, their novelty captivated the American public and the world.  Movies led to a common culture of fashion and behaviour across the United States as fans in different cities watched their favorite screen idols and then emulated their style of dress, makeup and mannerisms.

Although these silent movies were primitive by today’s standards, they nevertheless pioneered many movie making techniques which are still used today, including the use of camera angles and camera movement.

The photographs that follow offer a glimpse into  the early movie studios was set up, and the techniques used by the actors and pioneer film makers.

The Lasky Studio of the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Hollywood, California

The Lasky Studio of the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Hollywood, California

A movie scene being filmed in the open. The cameras and lights are mounted on a platform on the right of the picture. Note the large number of extras.

A movie scene being filmed in the open. The cameras and lights are mounted on a platform on the right of the picture. Note the large number of extras.

The Film Drying Room

The Film Drying Room

The picture above shows workers feeding the newly printed copies of the film, which literally consisted of thousands of still photos arranged in sequence on a large roll of film, through equipment designed to dry the film so that it could be made ready for shipment and use in the movie projectors.

Building a Movie Set

Building a Movie Set

Movie Extras Waiting on Set to Go On Stage

Movie Actors Waiting on Set to Go On Stage

Print Frame Where Movie Scenery is Painted

Print Frame Where Movie Scenery is Painted

Checking "Extras" Used in Rex Beach's Photodrama, "The Brand." Produced for Goldwyn at its Culver City Studios

Checking "Extras" Used in Rex Beach's Photodrama, "The Brand." Produced for Goldwyn at its Culver City Studios

Filiming a Movie on a Sound Stage

Filiming a Movie on a Sound Stage

Wardrobe Room in a Movie Studio

Wardrobe Room in a Movie Studio

Many of the first movies were based on historical incidents or characters. This made it easier for the studio writers to churn out movies quickly since the plot did not have to be created from scratch.

Many of the first movies were based on historical incidents or characters. This made it easier for the studio writers to churn out movies quickly since the plot did not have to be created from scratch.

This picture depicts the same scene as above but viewed from a different angle. Here you can see the camera men and other technicians.

This picture depicts the same scene as above but viewed from a different angle. Here you can see the camera men and other technicians.

Film Makers

Film Makers

A Movie Director

A Movie Director

Movie Lighting

Movie Lighting

A Dressing Room

A Dressing Room

Preparing to Shoot a Scene

Preparing to Shoot a Scene

Although a lot has changed since these early silent movies, it is interesting to see that a lot is still recognizable. In fact, many of the film making techniques developed at the beginning of the 20th century are still in use today.

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